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Diabetes care and COVID-19

An illustration of a woman holding a glucose meter amid an array of giant diabetes equipment

Dec. 2, 2021—Many people put off healthcare during the COVID-19 pandemic—including care for diabetes. Among adults under 30 with diabetes, nearly 9 in 10 delayed care during the pandemic, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). More than 60% of people ages 30 to 59 with diabetes did the same.

If you have diabetes, you probably know that managing your condition is important for your long-term health. But in the era of COVID-19, diabetes care is more important than ever. People with diabetes are more likely to have serious complications from COVID-19. According to the American Diabetes Association, controlling your condition may lower that risk.

If you delayed diabetes care during the pandemic, getting back on track doesn't have to be stressful. Start with these four steps, based on advice from CDC.

Keep up with daily care. Eating well and getting exercise every week can help keep diabetes in check. And make sure to take any medications your doctor has prescribed.

Schedule regular checkups. See your doctor at least once every six months. If you've been finding it harder to manage your diabetes during the pandemic, go every three months. Get a checkup for your mouth too: See your dentist at least once a year.

Catch up on tests. Make sure you have an A1C test at least every six months. And ask your doctor what other tests you may need. These may include eye or foot exams, a cholesterol check, or a kidney test.

Get vaccinated. The COVID-19 vaccines are safe and effective. They're the best way to avoid serious illness from COVID-19. If you're already vaccinated, get your booster shot.

Take charge of your health

Staying on top of diabetes care can help you stay well during the pandemic and in the years—and decades—to come. Get more help to live well with diabetes in our Diabetes topic center.

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